become a fire prevention engineer

What does a Fire Prevention Engineer do?

A fire prevention engineer (also known as a fire protection engineer) works to prevent fires. Specifically, they try to prevent damage and protect people from fires by recommending fire resistant or retardant materials and fire-detection equipment. Additionally, these experts are knowledgable in a variety of topics such as engineering and chemistry. Next, take a moment to watch a video to fast track your career in fire protection engineering.

How to Become a Fire Prevention Engineer

become a fire prevention engineer

To become a fire prevention engineer, employers typically look candidates with a bachelor’s degree. For example, bachelor’s degrees in fire protection engineering, fire safety engineering, or a related field such as civil or mechanical engineering is a must. These programs typically cover topics such as fire dynamics, fire modeling, fire protection systems, and fire safety design.

In fact, O*NET OnLine reports that most all fire prevention engineers surveyed held a bachelor’s degree. While working towards your bachelor’s in engineering, you would want to take focused courses on ergonomics, environmental safety, industrial hygiene, and occupational safety and health. While not always required, obtaining a master’s degree or Ph.D. in fire protection engineering or a related field can enhance your knowledge and career prospects, especially for research or academic positions.

Job Description of a Fire Prevention Engineer

Fire prevention engineers work with teams of people to advise them on the most effective fire prevention materials and equipment to use. Along with inspecting structures and recommending materials and equipment, these engineers may also design products to prevent fires or fire damage as well. Architects and other construction professionals use their expertise when working on structures to ensure fire code and standards are met. These engineers also inspect structures and report out recommendations to prevent fire damage and work they performed.

Article Citations

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Health and Safety Engineers.

National Center for O*NET Development. 17-2111.02. O*NET OnLine.