become a geothermal production manager

What does a Geothermal Production Manager do?

A geothermal production manager is responsible for running operations at a power generation facility such as a power plant. They ensure the plant is staffed accordingly and appropriately trained. They supervise workers as well and ensure they follow safety procedures and complete daily maintenance on equipment. Geothermal production managers may also be called operations, plant, or site managers.

Watch a video to learn what a geothermal production manager does:

https://www.yourfreecareertest.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/how_to_become_a_geothermal_production_manager.mp4

How to Become a Geothermal Production Manager

According to ONET OnLine, a college degree is not necessary to become a Geothermal production manager; however, extensive working experience in the geothermal production industry may be required for management positions. However, ONET OnLine does report that almost half of the geothermal production managers surveyed had taken some college courses, with nearly 20% having earned a certification or college degree. Skills and knowledge in mechanical machinery, administration and management protocols, production and processing logistics, safety or security regulations, and mathematical abilities are necessary to succeed as a geothermal production manager.

Job Description of a Geothermal Production Manager

Geothermal production managers manage staff at a geothermal power plant. They are responsible for running a safe and efficient work environment at the facility they are overseeing. All equipment at these facilities must be in top working order. Therefore, a Geothermal Production Manager must ensure they are being inspected, maintained, and repaired. They would also expect all staff to follow safety procedures and other facility policies. They may even have to perform or help with preventative maintenance on geothermal plant equipment inside their facilities.

Geothermal production managers hire staff, supervise, and ensure proper training occurs. They are complete annual and quarterly evaluations of each worker’s performance to ensure a high-functioning workforce. Geothermal production managers are also responsible for reports, oversee budgets, and analyze areas of improvement, including identifying and evaluating equipment or looking for procedural or conditional inefficiencies. Geothermal production managers spend 50 percent of their time between the plant’s production area and the other in an office inside the plant. When working in the production area, they usually wear protective equipment, such as a helmet or safety goggles, while interacting with staff or looking at equipment. Most geothermal production managers work full time, though they may occasionally work than 40 hours per week. At some sites, geothermal managers may work night or weekend shifts and must be on call to deal with emergencies at any time.

Geothermal Production Manager Career Video Transcript

You’ve got the power! Geothermal power, that is, if you choose to become a geothermal production manager. These professionals ensure that power plant worksites run smoothly, efficiently, and safely. Geothermal power is a sustainable energy source that uses heat from the earth’s core to power a generator and produce electricity. It’s a growing source of renewable, clean energy, with most geothermal power plants concentrated in the western United States.

Production managers at geothermal power plants supervise employees, develop policy, and make sure that everyone involved is informed about production and any safety issues they should be aware of. They’re also responsible for checking equipment constantly, so potentially dangerous malfunctions and inefficiencies can be nipped in the bud. For repairs, geothermal production managers are required to oversee maintenance and ensure compliance with all standards and regulations. Qualifications for this career vary from on-the-job experience, to an associate’s degree, or training in a vocational school, depending on the specific job and employer.

Article Citations

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Industrial Production Managers.

National Center for O*NET Development. 11-3051.02. O*NET OnLine.

The career video is in the public domain from the U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

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