What does a Satellite Installer do?

Median Pay $37,190
Growth Rate 0%
Citation Retrieved from BLS.gov

A satellite installer takes small antennas and installs them on houses or businesses in order to provide television and internet access to their client. These installers also maintain and service the equipment they install so their customer receives quality reception. They can work indoors and outdoors and spend time traveling from their client’s locations.

How to Become a Satellite Installer

Step 1: Minimum Requirements

To become a satellite installer, employers typically require a high school diploma or GED. You’ll also need to drive a company vehicle to and from your client’s locations so employers require valid drivers license.

Step 2: Get Hired

Next, you can apply for companies that are looking for satellite installers. Employers may also require a background check since you will be working around their client’s homes and business and issue you a drug test. Companies that hire satellite installers provide the on-the-job training necessary to be successful at the company and you’ll be overseen by a more experienced installer.

Step 2: Advance your Career

Since you will be gaining experience on-the-job installing antenna’s, you can advance your career and take electronic-equipment training classes at your local technical school or community college. These programs teach you how to work on more sophisticated equipment. O*NET OnLine reports that a little over 60% of the satellite installers surveyed earned a certification after high school.

Job Description of a Satellite Installer

how to become a satellite dish installer

A satellite installer takes small satellites antennas that are about three feet or less in size and mounts them to homes and businesses. They strategically install these antennas so they receive the best reception. Then, they run a cable from their antenna to a modem/satellite receiver for connectivity. After installing the necessary equipment, satellite installers test the system to be sure it functions correctly. They must also educate their client to operate the equipment they just set up and ensure they understand the directions. Installers use tools to such as a drill, screwdriver, and small electrical tools. As they may be required to reach high locations on the exterior of a building, they must also use ladders and safety equipment.

Article Citations

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers.

National Center for O*NET Development. 49-2097.00. O*NET OnLine. This page includes information from O*NET OnLine by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA. RethinkOldSchool, Inc. has modified all or some of this information. USDOL/ETA has not approved, endorsed, or tested these modifications.